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with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really t
would be -- so much fun. then he ran for the u.s. senate and told me to go off to law school. he said, you have been on enough losing campaigns in your life. then i went to law school and came back to new hampshire. i had had a big opening at a college that was all male for 200 years. i feel we have been forging our way, but luckily i had a governor shaheen, my mother, who mentored her, and i have been mentored by colleagues. i thing the opportunities are coming in abundance now. doors are open, law schools are more than 50% women. our class going into congress is the most diverse class ever, in all aspects. fascinating. so anyone younger than me, there are wide open opportunities. >> we all have a debt of gratitude to governor shaheen and senator ayotte for serving as attorney general. when my mother ran for congress, up 15% of voters would not even consider a woman candidate. when i think of the courage -- for the rest of us, now women on the ballot are very much accepted. >> i have to tell a story. susan used to tell the story about campaigning in that 1980 election. one time she w
year's to be signed into law. today is the 27. and so you have a few days left for lawmakers to make a deal. the president's should land at some point. there is a 5 hour time difference. they have to figure out something. it seems likely will go over the cliff. it has been looking like that before the holiday, but certainly now, particularly if you remember for congress broke for the christmas break, speaker raynor was not able to get the backup plan through his caucus, so there was no pressure on democrats to try to counter that immediately. senate democrats saying we passed a bill that raises tax rates on incomes over $250,000, we ran on this and this is what we are offering. house republicans were saying, no, we want to negotiate something, figure it out and send it to us. someone is going to have to move. the question is, who? the president met with senate majority leader harry reid before going to hawaii and his offer was to extend the tax cuts for incomes under $250,000, extend unemployment insurance benefits, and the lady across -- and then delay the across the board automati
they want to bill, the infrastructure, the programs they make into law. guest: i think james hits on the virtue of a flat tax, having a low, single rate, getting rid of all the loopholes in the tax code and having the government learn to live within its means. that would take some time, but it is eminently doable with positive reforms on the entitlement for younger people. you do not have to change the benefit formulas for those on medicare or social security or who are about to go on those systems. as younger people know, those systems are headed for a crash. the sooner we reform them in a positive way, the better. the key to do it is not by raising taxes, but by having a low single rate and they learn to live within it. i think you'll have a much more prosperous country for it. host: let's end where we started. what do you think the best solution in your personal view and your business view is to the fiscal cliff situation? guest: aside from not doing something foolish and the next three or four days -- that is why i do not mind kicking the can down the road -- would be to follo
in places like california and hawaii because of land use laws from the 1960's. second, if you look to the community reinvestment act, if you think that is the cause of the bubble, you have to explain why there was not a bubble in houston, raleigh, n.c., that winter? -- atlanta? it applied to those cities just as much as san francisco and miami, yet there were bubbles there and no balls in houston, omaha, -- bubbles in houston, ohio, -- global hawk, where have you. host: you conclude the book with "home ownership is not just an american dream, a dream of people all over the world. guest: that is absolutely right. a lot of research has shown that homeownership is one way to help people get out of poverty. if you want to start a small business, it turns out most are started with a loan on a business owner's home. if you want to put your kids through college, you can borrow against your home. homeownership is a way to build wealth. yet we have government saying we should get more people into apartments, fewer people into cinder the -- single-family homes. host: what is the track over l
trillion over ten years. here we are today, december 19, and these law changes which i referenced earlier, the end of the bush era tax cuts, the dreaded sequester, across the board cuts of $1.2 trillion in spending will begin to take effect the first of next year. the good news is the white house and republicans have been trading proposals and at least yesterday appeared to be moving closer together. i would have much preferred that they would be talking about a bigger package than they've discussed but nonetheless to reach a package that would resolve some of these issues would be an important step forward and i think help promote certainty that would be important to our economy. on the revenue side of the equation, i just want to remind you what it's taken in the past to balance the budget. we hear talk on average revenue is in the 18% of g.d.p. range n. getting back to average you will should be sufficient. the problem with that is we have never balanced the budget in the last 50 years based on 18% of g.d.p. in revenue. balancedtimes we've going back to 1969, you can see that revenue h
was the limit. that really was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i did go to law school. in the early 1980's when i got out of law school, i went back to tennessee to practice. i was going around to law firms. there were not that many women in the law firms. i had guys interview me. they would sit me down and say, do you understand you have to try cases? >> [laughter] >> i said that is what i wanted to do and was excited about it. i have clients in the beginning, i would go in to meet them. afterwards, one of my partners would say that they say that was not what i expected. he did not know there was going to be a lady lawyer on this case. but i really liked trying cases. it was a lot of fun. then i was drawn into politics. throughout my career, i have been interested in how to change things for the better. i have been very fortunate to have lots of opportunities to serve. >> you mentioned your mother. your mother died of lung cancer. she was such a force in your life. >> i think it made me very strong because it was very clear i had no one to depend on but me. >> 3 the o
they cannot afford to repay. the national consumer law attorney took part in the discussion examining student loan debt and its effects on both the student and the parents. this is about an hour and 20 minutes. >> with a degree come student debt. i'm really happy to be here tonight. it is great to take some time, to have this many and this whole set up to discuss these things, and these issues. i think propublica does a fantastic job with this, as they do with everything. we are happy to have a fantastic panel with the array of experts you would want to be discussing this issue. marion has been covering this for propublica, and a month ago had a fantastic piece that would-be the result of months of investigation of the debt burden on parents. that is an aspect that not a lot of people have been talking about. although you may have read about it on the cover of the "new york times" today, a month ago is when she began talking about it. we have the publisher and author of a best seller called "secrets to winning a scholarship." next to him, an attorney with the national consumer law center and
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8